General News

2007 Summit Success

 

Image
The core team and board of directors posing.
The recent Joomla! Summit, held last month at Google, provided the opportunity for core team members to consider a number of project position appointments.  The team supported a vote for the appointment of Johan Janssens, Louis Landry and Shayne Bartlett as project managers.  The new appointments of project managers provides a remit to work in facilitation roles with working group coordinators.  This move takes the functional roles which the project has been working with from interim phase to a more formal structure.

 

 

We also take this opportunity to recognise three champions of open source.  Core team members David Gall, Emir Sakic and Rey Gigataras are stepping down from core team positions.  David, who worked in translations and on several Open Source Matters issues, is moving forward with personal goals.  Emir, whose history with the project goes back to the Mambo days — as does Rey — has a range of projects on the boil.  And finally, Rey, the stalwart 'Mr Fixit' of Mambo and Joomla! off to pastures new.

More information

The Summit provided the opportunity for the Core Team and Open Source Matters Board of Directors to scope out a range of significant functional issues.  The process involved discussion and debate of key issues with guidance facilitated by hand-picked experts.  The licensing discussion was of primary importance, given the forthcoming release of Joomla! 1.5.  More information will be released as progress is made.  We're making some good progress with the help of James Vasile of the Software Freedom Law Center — but we are not there yet.  As soon as we have something concrete, we will start the external communication of this progress.  Moreover, working to improve our communication channels was discussed and we've decided to endeavor to put out monthly reports as blog posts from working groups.

Thank you very much

The combined Summit and Joomla!Day USA (West) provided an amazing focus for core members and community interaction.  There's no substitute for face-to-face meetings and collaboration.  An event of this scale could not have happened without the most generous support of Google — a special thanks to Leslie Hawthorn for creating the opportunity, great food and opening up the Googleplex to open source geeks.  We'd also like to thank Allen Gunn from Aspirationtech for facilitating the Summit.  Last but not least, we'd like to thank the community ... everyone from the mom and pop hobbyists to professional website developers.  We are an interesting bunch indeed.  As a key part of the open source recipe, community thinking is always paramount to our considerations.

 

Joomla's 100k Ain't Bad!

100k ReasonsIt's official — Joomla! has the largest Open Source CMS focused forum on the planet. In fact, by reaching 100,000 users signed up (validated), Joomla! contends with some of the biggest forums on the Internet.  We reckon forum.joomla.org is in the top 10 of all comers.

Reaching this 100k watershed is significant as the heart of this reveals true Open Source source spirit with many of these members sharing their knowledge and experience.   And this strength — the backbone of the project in many ways — manifests in a mature 'eco-system' that's self-supporting. Thousands of helping hands and minds.

"Joomla's success rides on the support available to end users through (among other places) our community forum," said Core Team member Brad Baker.  "Time and time again, we hear users thanking us for the software, yet, without the active community Joomla! would not be where it is today ... one of the world's most popular Open Source projects.  You are all a part of this and deserve a hearty thanks."

What's particularly heartening is that despite Joomla's phenomenal growth, the forum continues to engender friendly, helpful advice.  When we started Joomla! back in September 2005 there were  naysayers, and plenty of them.  In fact one so-called industry expert said Joomla! would "be a niche CMS".  There's something rather gratifying in proving people wrong.  Everyone who's taken the time to answer a question, solve a problem or submit a bug report is part of this success.

We could start quoting the ever-increasing statistics in this story however a quote from a pragmatic new user sort of sums up how things are working:

"To make my decision, I finally decided to look at the community that surrounded and supported each product. As a test, I made an inquiry into the general support message boards of each product. My Joomla post received a number of helpful responses in a relatively short time frame. My ****** (another Open Source software) post languished for days, and even after asking a second time for feedback, was still unanswered. As I'm going to be learning each system, and relying on others to help me, this experience ultimately swung the pendulum to Joomla."

Okay, we couldn't resist, here's some numbers:

  • An average of 172 new user sign-up each day
  • 765,000 posts
  • More than 1200 posts daily

Again, congratulations particularly to those of you who've taken the time to extend a helping hand.  We are made stronger by those helpful souls around us.

Free A3 Poster

To celebrate this special occasion, download this high-resolution A3-size PDF poster (for personal, non-commercial use only).

 

JoomlaCode.org Shifts Forge's Gears

Digg!

ImageToday marks a defining moment in the Joomlasphere, which sees the launch of our gForge.  Yes, the new 'V8 hot rod' has arrived — and we believe it will provide the best development environment for a number of reasons but primarily to future-proof and cope with huge load.

 

The Paint Dried Today

When we announced the move last week, we still had plenty left to do to 'Pimp our Ride' but the team has done an amazing job.  Today we've sent out emails to project administrators to inform them they will get best benefit by: 1. registering on the new Forge asap, 2. reconciling their download links on their Extensions Directory projects.

"We've had to throw a lot of time at the Forge," said Louis Landry.  "This has been extremely resource hungry in terms of development team hours but we're happy with the end result — and we believe Joomla's army of third party developers (3PDs) will be too.  This was a challenge that had to be taken on full-frontal — the outcome should be self-evident in the biggest Open Source development environment on the planet."

 

The Process for 3PD Projects  

Louis said 3PDs of larger projects can make individual requests for migration from the old Forge.  "We've managed to migrate Joomla! including our subversion repository ... but this has been very taxing time wise," he said.  "We recommend developers start afresh where they can.  Owners of larger projects which merit migration should contact the Forge team and make a request to that end," he said.

 

Driving Lessons for Project Admins

The new Forge has detailed instructions which can be read here.  It's worth noting that the Forge is primarily a place for code and development.  Note: If you're a non-developer looking for Joomla! extensions, the Extensions Directory is the place to search.

 

Feedback  Loop

ImageAs the Forge in itself is a work in progress, we would appreciate any feedback with issues you discover which may need attention.  Enjoy the ride.